Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games 4 Reasons Individual Awards (UEFA "Ballon D’Or" and FIFA "The Best") in Football Should Be Scrapped

You are searching about Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games, today we will share with you article about Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games is useful to you.

4 Reasons Individual Awards (UEFA "Ballon D’Or" and FIFA "The Best") in Football Should Be Scrapped

The Ballon d’Or is an award given by UEFA and France Football magazine while “The Best” is awarded by FIFA, the ethically challenged arbiter of the world’s most popular sport. Although they are prestigious because they are decadent, both awards are a tangible appreciation of the authors and experts (confederation administrators, coaches, football team captains, fans, etc.) whose views and opinions are presented. Currently, both awards have become egotistical before the post because no one has epitomized the toxic and political nature of both awards more than the recipients of the past decade. Comparisons between football players in the Football League (for these awards) are a guilty pleasure for fans from time to time. Like most sports awards, fans always root for their favorites – but like many others, it’s hard to make a statistical case that one player is more valuable than another. The point is that teams are like machines. One part, however important, cannot function properly without the other. The award only measures prolific goal-scoring but as any manager will tell you, it’s probably not enough to carry a successful football team. Comparisons between football players are basically what make trading cards, sticker albums and fantasy soccer so popular but should have no place in an official capacity. And how can we improve what we currently have? The basic truth is, we cannot do without discontinuing the award for the following reasons:

Football is a team sport: Debating individual footballers among football fans is fun but in a team sport with multiple leagues, it is impossible to accurately measure such personality. Football (as we all know) is a team sport in which eleven men from two different squads of players compete against each other for a trophy, or in modern times, a salary at the end of it all. Every football team needs world class (top talent) goalkeepers, defenders, midfielders and attackers. [EPL, Serie A etc.]Continental [CAF, UEFA Champions League] and intercontinental [FIFA Club World Cup] Trophy No player or position is better or greater than another because everyone must work together to achieve a common goal. The greatest attackers of today (and in the past) would probably make terrible defenders and goalkeepers, and the greatest defenders and goalkeepers could be the game’s most feared attackers and midfielders. It seems wrong to constantly elevate a certain group of football players above their peers because of their position on the field of play. Football plays are played ‘firstly’, by the team’s strikers, midfielders, defenders and ‘secondarily’, by the (potential) opposition goal blocked by the same team’s defenders and goalkeepers. No player really wins a game single-handedly, unless he plays all positions at once – in his penalty box defending and punching away opposition shots on goal while also running into the opposition penalty area to score all kinds of goals. Most FIFA and UEFA individual award winners perform best when their team’s passing and playing style suits them, allowing them the same freedom as any other side. Most managers try to fit the best 11 players into the squad rather than fit the best 11 players into the squad. World-renowned managers such as Arsene Wenger and Jose Mourinho have reason to clearly despise and lash out at such individual awards in a team-based sport.

Biased towards attackers: Winners of FIFA and UEFA awards (present and past) are (almost) always players who play close to the opposition’s goal – such as strikers and attacking midfielders – enabling them to trust them and score goals. Teammates (keepers and goalkeepers) to prevent the opposing team from scoring and winning the game. In football, it is widely known and accepted that attack wins games but defense wins titles and trophies. Very few defenders and goalkeepers are known for their output on the field and the dirty work they do (so that their attacking teammates can score the ball in the opposition goal.) It is very disappointing that attackers are paid better than they are. Defenders and goalkeepers. Goalkeepers are typically the lowest paid in football teams, even under alarming levels of scrutiny, which begs the question of why anyone would choose to become a goalkeeper. No one has really found a way to compare the value of goaltenders to outfield players – to the goaltenders’ detriment. Should a goal stopped by a goalkeeper count as a goal scored by a striker? How much should quality defenders influence our keeper decisions – and how much should quality midfielders influence our forward decisions? There is no denying the fact that certain players improve the overall quality and effectiveness of certain teams, but even then, such exceptional players will not win anything for their respective teams, for example, a goalkeeper who saves every shot fired at him by the opposition. The beauty of modern football is that every player (bar the goalkeeper) is at least required to score whenever, however and whenever it pleases him or (to a lesser extent) his coach, so individual awards are only given to offensive players. Do a great disservice to their teammates and the game.

No specific criteria in awards: There are no specific criteria for awarding individual awards to players by UEFA and FIFA in football tournaments played. Most fans and administrators do not know which competitions – national leagues (EPL, La Liga, Serie A) continental leagues (UEFA Champions League – as all FIFA individual award winners are based in Europe) or international competitions (FIFA World Cup) – when FIFA and UEFA individual Athletes’ performance is given top priority when nominated for awards. Although most nominees and award winners play for football teams that are either champions in their domestic league or champions in the UEFA Champions League or champions with their countries at the World Cup (in a World Cup year), some winners of such awards play. For club-sides and countries that were not champions in domestic, continental and international competitions. Lionel Messi won the Ballon d’Or in 2010/2011 (because he scored 91 goals in one year) without winning Spain’s La Liga or the Champions League with Barcelona, ​​or Argentina beating other eligible players who won at least one of the above

A breed of individual and selfish footballers: In order to win individual awards from FIFA, some players abandon teamwork and effort, preferring to go it alone on the field of play – to show (as the fans would say) – that the team is at a loss. Such players don’t care if the team is winning or losing as long as they are scoring goals, increasing their goal tally and competing for awards by shooting for goals instead of passing the ball to a teammate in better position every set. -Pieces – Free Kicks, Penalties, Corner Kicks – These set-pieces are awarded in the game despite a poor record. This creates examples of a player winning the Ballon d’Or or Player of the Year award because he has scored the most goals in a football season in addition to 5 or 6 man-of-the-match performances and some amazing results in his team finishing trophy-less that season and finishing second in the competition’s finals. Highlight reel of the season while ending the best.

Finally, if there should be individual awards (for whatever odd reason), they should be based on objective criteria such as number of goals scored (best striker), number of saves (best goalkeeper) or number of tackles made (best). defender) etc. This also doesn’t make much sense because, again, scoring is all about team effort. No player can score a goal without the help of his teammates. And yes, even solo goals require a team effort. Therefore, it is inexplicable why football’s governing body, FIFA, would award awards that are so subversive of the very nature of the game it is supposed to regulate. FIFA should not give its name to a beauty pageant.

Video about Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games

You can see more content about Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games

If you have any questions about Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 3800
Views: 88425488

Search keywords Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games

Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games
way Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games
tutorial Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games
Do Football Players Get Paid More For Post Season Games free
#Reasons #Individual #Awards #UEFA #quotBallon #DOrquot #FIFA #quotThe #Bestquot #Football #Scrapped

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?4-Reasons-Individual-Awards-(UEFA-Ballon-DOr-and-FIFA-The-Best)-in-Football-Should-Be-Scrapped&id=9844594