Does A Goal Count As A Shot On Goal Football Soccer Offense – Tips For Selecting an Attacking Style For Recreational Soccer Teams

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Soccer Offense – Tips For Selecting an Attacking Style For Recreational Soccer Teams

Soccer offense is harder to teach than soccer defense. It’s easier to have a good soccer defense than a good soccer offense because it’s about destroying (or disrupting) the soccer defense and creating the soccer offense. Recreational soccer teams can get good defense by simply placing tough, aggressive players near the goal you are defending and kicking the ball to them. By doing this, the opponent should start a soccer attack every time and if your midfielders or forwards can win the ball they clear, not only do you have a chance to attack and score, but you can keep the ball away from the opponent. The opponent cannot score.

On the other hand, scoring goals against a good defense usually requires multiple players and a coordinated effort involving skillful soccer passing, dribbling, teamwork, and doing the right things at the right time. One mistake…one bad pass…and the attack ends with a kick to the ball or possession of the opponent’s ball. And even if the attacker manages to get close enough for a decent shot, the ball must still go past the goalkeeper and into the goal for the score to count.

Be realistic. You have to be realistic when deciding which attacking style to teach your team or you will get frustrated, your team will get frustrated, you will fail and nobody will have much fun. Let me use an analogy: If you decide you want to learn to juggle tennis balls using your hands, you’ll start with one or two balls first – you won’t start with 4. I actually learned how to juggle tennis balls and started with one, then two, then 3. I never got to 4 because I didn’t want to spend time practicing.

When deciding which attacking style you will teach your team, you must be realistic about the abilities of your players, the number of weaker players on your team, and the amount of time you have for soccer practice. The style of attack that you can successfully use with a team of all great players who practice 3 hours per week year round (eg travel team) will be different than the style you can use successfully for fun. A team that has a mix of players (some good and some weak) and practices only one hour per week.

Do you have any weak players?. Don’t expect a recreational team that has weak players and only practices once a week to play the same attacking style as a travel team with all the best players and practice and 3 hours of practice per week. Why is the number of weak players important? This is because weak players are like “weak links in a chain” if you try to use an attacking style. I’m not saying this makes sense, just to make a point that we should consider when choosing an attack style. If you have 3 players who can pass the ball and one can’t, a short passing attack involving a player who can’t pass will not work. This is why recreational coaches are in some ways more difficult than passenger coaches and attacking styles that are realistic for a passenger coach may not be realistic for a recreational coach.

An attacking style will only work if you have a great team without any weak players. The ideal attacking style would be to control the ball when you attack. Since we know that a player cannot dribble very far against good defenders, it seems logical and true that the best way to control the ball is to pass. That attacking style is called a “possession” style (or a shorter passing style or “indirect” style). Ideally, the team with the ball will control the ball throughout the field, even if the ball is near your own goal (called the “defensive third”). In fact, many professional teams play this way. But it is also true that not all professional teams play this way and not all national teams play this way. This is because it is difficult to make many short passes in a row when under pressure, and if you turn the ball over close to your goal, your opponent can score. Consider US football…most of the time a team will be on fourth down if they are inside their own 35 yard line (which is their defensive third). That’s because it’s too dangerous if they want to turn the ball over there.

Here is my recommendation: Use an attacking style that is realistic for your team and gives your team the best chance of success. Some coaches feel that they should try to teach recreational players a “possession” style attack for the entire field. That’s probably unrealistic for 99% of all recreational teams. On the other hand, most Rec teams may play an attacking style that uses long kicks (“direct” style) to get the ball into their attacking third (the third closest to the opponent’s goal) or into the attacking half. Then play a possession style as much as possible. I don’t think you’re doing anyone a disservice using this style and I suggest you teach it. It’s very different from just kicking the ball hard – you can teach your midfielders and forwards to shift so they’re in position to win the ball. are cleared by the fullback. How do midfielders and forwards know where to position themselves? It’s simple: teach your fullbacks to hit straight forward “lofted passes” and teach the midfielders and forwards to anticipate and position themselves so they can win those balls. This is an attack scheme that is easy to teach and can be used successfully by Rec teams. If a Rec player goes on to play on a travel team, he or she will learn a more controlled attacking style at that point. But in the meantime they will have fun and learn a lot, such as proper technique for in-off-foot passes, advanced throw-ins, getting into space, moving off the ball, first attacker/second attacker/third attacker, how to change positions to win a cleared ball. , playing fast and hard, requiring them to position and fight to win the ball, and a possession style of attack in the attacking third or attacking half. And on defense coaches can teach shift and sag (essentially maintaining size and funneling for those of us who use these terms), first defender/second defender, marking, zone defense, and much more.

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